In this one we will share the best outtakes of Spring 2019 Menswear… but we will show you the highlights of pieces of womenswear. This season collections are a lot of fun, super bold and we even might say a little extreme.

 

Dsquared2

Dean and Dan rustled up a really effective, tight-for-them collection that contained some of the funniest pieces of the season so far: sneakers for men and sneaker heels for women that took the Triple S/Archlight template – already pretty oversized – and pumped it full of DSquared2 steroids. Especially excellent were the women’s wedges that twisted the over-articulated moulded sole form 90 degrees and needed a velcro ankle strap to stay in place: they looked like mad fashion versions of the foot-braces of Sigourney Weaver’s power loader in Aliens.

 

Versace

props to Donatella Versace for taking a long, hard look at various masculine archetypes and attempting to skew the lens a little. To turn the hotness up again for those who want more to fantasize about than avocado toast. And just as importantly, to provide outfits for those who want to feel fantasize-able. This menswear collection was presented against a complementary women’s capsule—not Resort—the better to give a sense of the brand’s total world. 

 

Dolce & Gabbana

We are living in a millennial world and Dolce & Gabbana have spent the last few seasons exploring just that, with Instagram-cast shows featuring demographically specific influencers and Euro-aristos aplenty. “Now it’s time to turn a new page,” said Domenico Dolce pre-show. “We’ve been exploring sportswear, the new attitude, and learning a lot. . . .”

“And one big thing we have learned,” interjected Gabbana, “is that what the new generation wants from us most is our classics. We saw it in all the fittings. The perfectly tailored suits, the tuxedos, the black lace, the silk print dresses—the things we made that excited us 30 years ago are exciting young customers today. They want to make these things that are our own, their own. Really, we don’t work in fashion. Our job is to use the collections to talk about our story, and what we talk about is style.” 

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